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After I finish learning the Japanese From Zero series, I would like to learn Japanese from Japanese sources such as what a Japanese school/college student would study from. I would like these books to make use of Kanji as if it were everyday Japanese but they must use furigana.

migrated from japanese.stackexchange.com Oct 20 '18 at 18:45

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  • "what a Japanese school/college student would study from" で "make use of Kanji as if it were everyday Japanese" で "they must use furigana" て・・ そんなのあるかなぁ・・?? – Chocolate Oct 21 '18 at 13:28
  • Aside from "Japanese school" criteria, when I took Japanese courses at my university, they used Japanese books with kanji and furigana. I couldn't remember the title of the book though... however, based on their current curriculum, looks like they're using Minna no Nihongo. This is not the only book in full kanji/kana for learning Japanese though. If it's restricted to what Japanese schools used, then not sure if I can help... – Andrew T. Oct 21 '18 at 18:18
  • You might want to have a look at this course coelang.tufs.ac.jp/mt/ja/gmod/courses/c02, it does not have furigana but you can use a browser extension on an external website to append them – 永劫回帰 Nov 1 '18 at 11:24
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The problem with this question is that you are looking for something which is inherently an oxymoron: You want to find a language learning book for people who are mature natives of that language which use reading-aid tools to help consumption for non-natives of the language. No self-respecting publishing company would actually market such a thing, and no self-respecting native language speaker would consume it.

That said, you may not be entirely out of luck. While I can't point you to any specific ISBNs, if I had to read between the lines here, you seem to be looking for a book that teaches advanced Japanese in Japanese, rather than teaching Japanese in your native language (which I presume is English). To which there are plenty of good resources, although they might be hard to acquire outside of Japan. I would suggest starting by looking for Japanese-published JLPT study guides; I know for a fact (because I own them but do not have them on-hand at the moment to check the ISBNs/titles for you unfortunately) that there exist multiple product lines of study guides for JLPT N2 which seem to fit your purpose, if that's the level you are targeting. That said, it is unlikely that any native Japanese people would actually use such books, for many reasons, the least of which is that a Japanese native would have no interest in studying for or taking JLPT.

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