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it's easy to find lists of the radicals, eg. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_kanji_radicals_by_frequency#Table_of_kanji_radicals

However, many radicals have a lot more than one way of being written. As far as I understand, for example, there is a radical 戸. That does appear in the list I posted.

What does not appear in that list are the following variations of that radical, that as far as I understand are all considered to be the radical 戸: 戶 and 户.

Is there a list of all the radicals, such as the wikipedia one, which lists all alternative ways that radical can appear in kanji?

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Probably not a complete list, but the sci.lang.japan FAQ website has a table of radicals with their names and includes both 戶 and 戸.

BTW, I don't think 户 is used in Japanese kanji. From Wiktionary:

Alternative forms

  • 戶 (top stroke connects to left stroke) - used in Taiwan and South Korea.
  • 戸 (top stroke is a horizontal line that does not connect to other strokes, as found in the historical Kangxi dictionary) - used
    in Japan.
  • 户 (top stroke is a slanting dot) - used in mainland China and Hong Kong.

    Note also the different stroke order: 户 and 戸 have the leftmost 丿 as the final (fourth) stroke, while 戶 (this character) has 丿 as the second stroke.

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It may not have all the variant forms which you are looking for, but the most comprehensive list on the internet that I am aware of is this one:

http://www.natubunko.net/kotoba03.html

This site is all in Japanese. This site includes lots of variant names of radicals like よつてん for the れっか (below-fire) radical. Another thing which makes it more comprehensive than most is that it also includes the kanji versions of the radical names, like 三水 for "sanzui", where almost all the other sites only have kana names.

(In case it isn't clear, you need to click on the radicals on the page above to go to the more comprehensive information pages. There is one sub-page for each stroke count of radicals, I think.)

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